If you live in the heartland of America-Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota-the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square will be in your area next summer for a six-city tour June 12 through June 20, 2013.

Performances are planned for Columbus, Ohio, at the Nationwide Arena; Indianapolis, Indiana, at the Bankers Life Fieldhouse; Chicago, Illinois, as part of the Ravinia Festival; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, at the Milwaukee Theater; Madison, Wisconsin, at the Overture Center for the Arts; and Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the Target Center.

This 360-voice, all-volunteer chorus and 65 members of the Orchestra at Temple Square will perform a program with music from Bach to Broadway, folk tunes to patriotic favorites. “There is nothing quite like hearing the Choir live in concert,” says Ron Jarrett, president of the Choir since August 2012 and a former member of the Choir for eight years.

via Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

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Creed lead singer Scott Stapp tells his story about "looking up" and making it to the sunrise.

via Rock star's renewed faith in God credited for recovery | Fox News Video.

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Brit Hume: I grew up in the Episcopal church. I went to an Episcopal boys day school for nine years, and I can still basically recite the Liturgy from the old prayer book of the morning prayer service because we said it every day of the week for nine years at that school where I went. I considered myself a Christian. If someone had asked me if you’re a Christian, I would have said, ‘Of course I’m a Christian.’

But I think I was what you would call a nominal Christian. I went through my adult life with little thought day by day of God or Christ or any of the rest of it. I just didn’t think about it very much. When my son died in 1998, you know, when something shattering like that happens, I think it’s likely to be moment or can well be a moment where you find out what you really believe, and as horrible as that was, and it was bad, and it was heartbreaking and it was unexpected and it was very painful, I had the feeling through it all, that God was there, that He would rescue me from grief and pain, and that, I would get through it, and I knew I believed, and I knew it with enormous force. And things happened during that period that I looked to Him as the only reasonable explanation.

You have to understand, I’d been a street correspondent at ABC News eventually covering the White House and was well-known within certain circles, but outside of those circles, even a White House correspondent isn’t that well-known in the country. You’re just not. And when I went to FOX News, I was the second best thing to being in the Witness Protection Program. We were so small in those days. The audience was so tiny that I basically dropped out of sight for more than a year before this happened, and yet, the outpouring of sentiment for me, of sympathy and condolence that I got was absolutely astonishing.

My home address isn’t well-known, and yet somehow, in the weeks that followed that incident of his death, we had to send out ‘thank you’ notes to nearly a thousand people who had written to me. They were in my mailbox when I came home at night, stuffed to capacity, and people sent prayer cards and they told me about trees that had been planted in his name and so on.

I don’t know how, I mean I know it made news around the country that he died, that he committed suicide, but I can’t image, I was astonished at that response. I thought I was seeing the face of God. And I felt enormously lifted by it, I felt grateful for it, and I said to myself, ‘Well, Hume, turns out you’re a Christian. Now, what are you going to do about it?’

And I’ve been trying to answer that question ever since, and I’m constantly (chuckles) it’s difficult to lead the Christian life, it’s not easy. And you know, you always ask yourself the famous question, ‘If somebody accused you of being a Christian, would there be enough evidence to convict you?’ And I hope, day by day, that some evidence to that effect is accumulating. I’m trying. Not easy.Brody: And you wanted more of that evidence, if you will, in the sense that I know when you left Fox that you talked about the three G’s.You talked about devoting more time to your granddaughters, but also, God, as well. Talk to me about that and what that’s been like since.

Hume: Well, I wish that I could tell you that I have grown in my faith and my walk by leaps and bounds. Every day, I get up in the morning, and I walk out to get a cup of coffee, and my wife is always up ahead of me, and she’s reading the Bible. She goes through it every year. I’ve gone through it altogether myself, once. And I feel like I’m sort of lapped in my walk every day by my great wife, but I’m in there pitching, and I just now came from a Bible study that a group of us do every other Monday.

I’m a little disaffected with the church that I belonged to for so long, and I’m kind of on the lookout for the right place to go, but I’m thinking about it every day and struggling with all the things that we sinners struggle with. You know, Christianity is a religion for sinners, and thank God for me it is.

Brody: Can you imagine people’s lives that don’t have Christ in them?…I’m just wondering without Jesus Christ, I mean, you just wonder what people’s lives would be like without Him.

Hume: Well, I think it’s fair to say that while down deep I had a faith in Christ, I didn’t really live that life for most of my adult life, and I had successes and failures and ups and downs like everybody else, but I can’t say that I had the kind of inner peace that you get when you kind of surrender to your faith and put your trust elsewhere, which is hard to keep doing.

We don’t naturally do that as human beings. We naturally want to take charge ourselves, and we naturally are trying to get God to help us with or plans instead of us trying to help be a part of His plans. And I think that’s part of the struggle, but when you’re doing things, at times, where you have the sense that now I’m on God’s plan, and it’s a feeling worth having.

via Only on Brody File: Brit Hume Saw the 'Face of God' after Son Committed Suicide.

Courtesy: CBN News/The Brody File

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Artist's Rendering of Mormon Historical Site

Susquehanna County native daughter, Emma Hale’s home is a “sacred place to the church,” Dunford said. “(The project) will not only be to honor Joseph Smith, but also Emma.”

“We feel strongly about the history of what occurred here,” said Dunford.

Community leaders indicated they thought the development of the site could be a boon to the local economy.

Currently, about 20,000 people visit the site each year.

Dunford said he expects that number to double after the work in completed.

Dunford also shot down rumors that the LDS Church would be building a hotel in the area.

“No hotel is being constructed by the Church,” he said. “But one may be by someone who sees an opportunity.”

via Susquehanna Independent Weekender 

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Mormon Artists needed

NAUVOO, Ill. — Applications to audition to be a young performing missionary next summer in the Illinois Nauvoo Mission are due Nov. 30. Late applications will not be considered.

Each year 20 stage missionaries, two to four tech missionaries and 16 to 18 band members are selected through an audition process, and will receive a four-month Church Service Mission call from May 3 to Aug. 13, 2013, to the Illinois Nauvoo Mission, assigned to serve in Nauvoo, according to a news release.

via Nauvoo looking for young performing missionaries | Deseret News.

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With the cheers of the Republication National Convention still ringing in the ears of the electorate, it’s hard to remember that roughly a year ago, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was like the nerdy middle-aged dad of the Republican Party, someone who made the cool kids roll their eyes and whose presidential potential was exciting and galvanizing mostly to his existing supporters.

Rick Perry, Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich, Herman Cain, Rick Santorum and even non-candidates like Chris Christie or Sarah Palin got people fired up. Romney elicited the sort of descriptions normally reserved for things like broccoli and dental floss — useful, advisable, practical.

In a word, boring. Or is that boring like a fox? Journalist Ron Scott, author of the biography "Mitt Romney: An Inside Look at the Man and His Politics" (Lyons Press, $16.95), said he thinks at least some of the blandness of candidate Romney's steady march to the nomination was by design, a lesson-learned strategy prompted by the failures of his bid for the nomination in 2008.

The Romney of 2012, Scott said, is tougher, shrewder, better prepared and better organized, with rigid discipline, a clear sense of mission and a tendency to be "annoyingly on message." No distractions. No grandstanding. "That's what got him the nomination," Scott said.

The newfound practicality and poise may also just be part of who Romney is. On a superficial level, Romney might appear to be a carbon copy of his father, Michigan governor and former presidential candidate George Romney. Scott said that George Romney's influence certainly helped steer Mitt Romney into politics, but that the son probably also learned to avoid some of the things that were an impediment to his famous father. While the elder Romney was a fearlessly plainspoken man of the people, Scott said, the younger Romney has always been more aloof, cerebral and unswervingly focused.

via Mitt & Mormonism.

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Does Mitt Romney’s Mormonism make him too scary or weird to be elected to President of the United States?

via Polygamy? Magic underwear? People on bikes? Glenn discusses Mormon myths in TheBlaze TV special! – Glenn Beck.

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We all know the power of music in our lives and feel the Spirit when we sing hymns in church each week. But there are tons of other amazing songs in all of Mormondom, and we need your help to figure out which are THE BEST.

Please take just a few minutes to vote for your TOP 5 favorite songs, which you can select from the alphabetical list or by searching for it. The winners will be featured in LDS Living magazine and a companion CD.

via LDS Living Music Survey.

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When most people think of reality shows, they think of drunken fist fights, profanity laced tirades and sexual escapades.

But it’s a pretty safe bet that BYUtv’s new reality show — chronicling the gospel-filled adventures of eight real-life Mormon missionaries — won’t follow that formula.

via New reality show follows Mormon missionaries | The Salt Lake Tribune.

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Hollywood has never taken to Mormons the way it has with members of many other faiths.

Sure, there was "Brigham Young," the epic 1940 Western starring Tyrone Power and Linda Darnell as Mormon pioneers and Dean Jagger as the title character. But depictions like that were few and far between.

It took LDS filmmakers to get the ball rolling around the turn of the 21st century, with a wave of independently produced movies made by and for Mormons.

These filmmakers usually had miniscule budgets, and it showed in far too many cheap-looking and horribly acted movies. But some titles showed talent at work.

via Looking back: Ten films show the best from ‘Mormon Cinema’ | The Salt Lake Tribune.

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Mormon Artist seeks Inspiration

Utah Valley University theater professor Chris Clark, right, works with students James McKinney, left, and Eric Phillips at UVU in Orem on Monday, Sept. 10, 2012. JAMES ROH/Daily Herald

"People were so surprised with the show at Sundance," Clark said. "Some people would say, 'That was Broadway quality. Those actors were Broadway quality.' And I don't think they were exaggerating. We have a lot of local talent that's as good as anything we will see in the bigger cities. And you can chalk that up to the [LDS] Church — a lot of people do because the church pushes art — but I think parents here encourage their kids into the arts in a way they don't in other places. I just think it's exciting the way the arts are flourishing in Utah. We're very, very lucky."

Another important component of Clark's process of creating a powerful production is being open to inspiration.

"I think a lot of my work as a director relies on inspiration," Clark said. "Some people might call that intuition, but I sometimes feel like I am spiritually inspired to do certain things on stage. And I know that might sound shallow to some people who think that maybe the Spirit doesn't care about my 'stupid play,' but I think theater is such a great tool for teaching and for helping people improve their lives that I absolutely think that God can inspire me to have certain ideas or give certain direction so the show will sustain the Spirit."

As he continues to influence the community, his students and the future of the theater program at UVU, Clark's mantra is well summed up in his favorite line from Benedick in "Much Ado About Nothing": "Serve God, love me and mend."

"It's kind of our job," Clark said. "Serve God, love each other and mend any problem we run into."

via Popular local director, professor discusses family and faith.

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Steve Klein, one of the men behind the anti-Muslim video tied to violent riots across the Middle East and North Africa, doesn't restrict his fervor to attacks on Islam: He also runs one of the most prominent anti-Mormon sites on the web.

An insurance agent and Christian activist from California, Klein has become the face of the movie, "Innocence of Muslims," promoting it in the press as the film's director is, reportedly, in hiding.

His most recent foray into religious provocation though, was hardly his first. In 1977, Klein founded a group called Courageous Christians United, whose main focus is to expose Mormonism and Islam — both "false religions" and "cults" according to Klein — with protests outside their places of worship, low-rent media productions like the now-viral Youtube video, and SEO-efficient web properties.

To accomplish this, the group runs MormonInfo.org, an expansive collection of anti-Mormon content whose benign URL belies the intensity of its mission. In addition to boilerplate criticism of the church's doctrines and policies, the site once managed to sneak an activist into a Mormon temple — which, after initial public tours, are only open to devout Latter-day Saints — and record one of the ceremonies. The site posted the video to YouTube under the headline, "Welcome to Mitt Romney's World," and described the ceremonial garb worn in the temple as that of a "gay Irish baker."

via Anti-Muslim Film Figure Also Runs Leading Anti-Mormon Site.

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One of the common criticisms leveled against Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is that he almost comes across as being “too” put-together and restrained when it comes to showing emotion. While Ann Romney has provided much warmth and been a good focal point for campaign-watchers seeking insight into the softer-side of her husband, those whose lives have been touched and changed for the better by the GOP nominee are speaking out to share their personal stories of compassion, comfort and support.

via The Real Mitt Romney: Beck Interviews People Whose Lives Have Been Touched by GOP Nominee | Video | TheBlaze.com.

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Brandon Flowers -Latter-day Saint, Mormon

After performing his 11th concert this month in Europe as a part of the iTunes Download 2012 festival, Killers lead singer Brandon Flowers appeared on “Skavlan,” a Norwegian TV show, to wrap up a European trip before the Sept. 17 release of the band's new album "Battle Born."

The show started out as a normal celebrity guest appearance, but host Fredrik Skavlan soon began inquiring about Flowers' Mormon faith. Skavlan asked Flowers to describe the "beauty of faith," and the international rock star spoke positively about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

However, Skavlan later welcomed Richard Dawkins, author of "The God Delusion," onto the stage. The famous atheist immediately was asked his opinion on faith, and began denouncing the Book of Mormon, Joseph Smith and the Mormon faith.

Flowers didn't concede to Dawkins' remarks, although he was obviously surprised the interview had taken this turn.

Talking directly to Flowers, Dawkins called the Book of Mormon "an obvious fake." He also referred to church founder Joseph Smith as a "charlatan."

After several statements by Dawkins, Flowers responded: "The book's been studied and torn apart and looked at — and I am not one of the professors that have done it — but to call this man a charlatan, I take offense to it."

via Rock star Brandon Flowers defends Mormon faith against famous atheist | Deseret News.

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Now, I don't want to wander too much in the academic weeds, but there is something profound buried in the concept of model minorities — and it relates to Bill Clinton's description of his experience with LDS missionaries this week.

via Mormon Media Observer: Clinton raises the Mormon issue — or not | Deseret News.

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Over the last few months, it has been absolutely stunning to see Mitt Romney, of all people, portrayed as some sort of greedy, ruthless, unfeeling corporate raider who plows over everyone who gets in his way so he can make a few dollars more. Of all the criticisms you could aim at Mitt Romney, there is none that has less validity than that one. In fact, the vast majority of people who read this column — whether they're liberal, conservative, or moderate — probably don't personally know a single person who has proven to be more generous and compassionate than Mitt Romney. Yes, really. It's okay if you're skeptical — but, you won't be after you finish reading this column.

via 7 Incredible Personal Stories About Mitt Romney That You May Not Know – John Hawkins – [page].

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Salt Lake City Mormon Temple

I was reminded last week, upon reading Simon Critchley’s opinion piece in the New York Times, what a unique stretch of time we’re in. Much has been written about the Mormon Moment. As a columnist, I’ve been watching this moment snowball for more than a decade, from the rustlings that came during the 2002 Winter Olympics up until now.

A lot has changed in that period of time. The number of famous Mormon faces has grown, thanks to reality shows, business success, blogging, politics and some best-selling books. The way we’re scrutinized has changed. A decade ago, the media often deferred to non-Mormon experts on Mormonism. Now they reach more from within the faith to source their stories.

What hasn’t changed is some Mormons’ uneasiness with being in the limelight. I’ve heard from some people, ever since Mitt Romney began his campaign, "I don’t think it would be good for Romney to win the presidency because it would put too much negative attention on the church."

Now, whether you’re for Romney or not (and this column isn’t intended to be political), I am surprised by that reaction. After all, ours is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that sends out thousands of missionaries each year to spread the "good news."

I think some of us are uneasy with negative media attention for several reasons. It’s hard to hear about our faith described in such a clinical way, or to be the punch line on the newest fall comedy show. The roots of our founding and migration were born out of persecution and ridicule, and in an increasingly secular landscape, it’s challenging to be a person of any faith hearing that criticism in the wings.

It isn’t that we don’t want publicity. It’s that we want it on our own terms. We want to be the candle on the hill, but only if we get to hold the match. It’s a natural instinct. Everyone wants to be seen in the most attractive light possible; that is what public relations is all about.

via In the Whirled: Mormons shouldn't squirm in the spotlight | Deseret News.

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Mormon Social Media Ideas

Though it's simple to link to a mormon.org profile on a Facebook page or write a post about faith on a blog, there are other easy ways for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to express their faith — digitally.

Twitter users can find out a lot about a person by who they follow on their profile. LDS Twitter users can follow the Mormon Channel (@mormonchannel), Mormon Messages (@mormonmessages), Mormon newsroom (@mormonnewsroom), mormon.org (@MORMONorg) and so on, and anyone examining profiles can see their faith and learn more about it.

On Pinterest, LDS Church membership can sometimes stick out in the pins on a member's pinboard. A few LDS-centric pins featuring Christ or general conference can hint to faith for anyone watching Pinterest activities.

On LinkedIn, a person’s faith can become apparent on a resume if attending a church school or serving a mission for the LDS Church is indicated.

On Facebook, users can declare their religion on their profile, or “like” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints page. Beyond that, users can visit developers.facebook.com and download a plugin that puts a “like” box on their blog. This plugin allows their blog visitors to like any one of the LDS Church’s Facebook pages directly from the blog.

Also, many bloggers use a mormon.org graphic that be downloaded from their personal mormon.org profile. This graphic will lead any visitors directly to this recorded expression of their faith. Several bloggers also install widgets to their blog that lead their viewers to LDS Church informational websites, including a series of widgets for LDS Philanthropies that features charitable projects around the world.

Jesse Stay, an LDS blogger who writes and consults about social media and new media architecture, said Latter-day Saints like to use these tools to show their faith in social media because their faith is who they are.

“It isn’t just what we believe; it isn’t just the doctrine of the church,” he said. “It’s about who we are as people. It’s about the first and second great commandments of loving God and loving your neighbor. Who we are is the essence of what being Mormon is.”

In his social media usage, Stay particularly likes to focus on the charitable activities and humanitarian efforts in which Mormons participate, from huge international projects to the way they raise their families.

“That’s a lot of why people share these (digital expressions of faith),” Stay said. “They give people a way to feature who they are. It piques the curiosity of readers of the blog to find out why this person is Mormon and what does that mean.”

Social media is really about the individual people behind the brand, Stay explained. People have blogs or other social media because they want to share who they are and give the world a little glimpse of their life. When they add a widget or a plugin, they are sharing even more of who they are and giving additional insights that people can use to find out more information about them.

via How LDS Church members can express their faith digitally | Deseret News.

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“You can’t stop people from having their own belief about who represents them the best,” Jowers said. “When they walk into the voting booth, they are going to decide who to vote for, and if that decision is based on religious preference, there’s nothing that can stop them from doing that. But that’s a different thing than an official religious test constitutionally.”

LDS scholar and author Matthew Bowman, who participated in the discussion over the telephone, said he feels that personal religious test has more to do with values than with specific religious denominations. But he acknowledged that for a long time, “Protestants were the people who could be trusted.”

“Catholics and Mormons belonged to a church where there was someone at the head who told everyone what to do,” Bowman said. “That made people uncomfortable, which affected Al Smith and John F. Kennedy. And I think now it also affects (Mitt) Romney.”

And that, Bowman said, is a “real and substantive and valid concern that needs to be addressed.”

via Documentary asks 'so what?' about Mitt's Mormonism | Deseret News.

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Jesse Stay, an LDS blogger who writes and consults about social media and new media architecture, said Latter-day Saints like to use these tools to show their faith in social media because their faith is who they are. “It isn’t just what we believe; it isn’t just the doctrine of the church,” he said. “It’s about who we are as people. It’s about the first and second great commandments of loving God and loving your neighbor. Who we are is the essence of what being Mormon is.” In his social media usage, Stay particularly likes to focus on the charitable activities and humanitarian efforts in which Mormons participate, from huge international projects to the way they raise their families. “That’s a lot of why people share these digital expressions of faith,” Stay said. “They give people a way to feature who they are. It piques the curiosity of readers of the blog to find out why this person is Mormon and what does that mean.”

via How LDS Church members can express their faith digitally | Deseret News.

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"Despite his difficulties, he keeps building — strengthened by those who believe in him, and unconcerned with those who don't."

Everything is Incredible from Tyler Bastian on Vimeo.

via Local teacher creates viral film about man with 'impossible' dream | ksl.com.

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The Piano Guys

It’s yesterday’s news that the Piano Guys, with more than 134 million total YouTube views under their belts, are worldwide Internet sensations.

The Utah group now has a famous mogul as its manager and has signed with Sony Masterworks recording label, with a self-titled debut album release on Oct. 2.

And KUED will tape a live Piano Guys concert at the Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre on Wednesday, Sept. 19, that will be broadcast locally in December with a national PBS broadcast set for the spring of 2013.

Not bad for five laid-back, middle-age men who only turned to YouTube in order to promote piano sales at a small St. George Yamaha Piano dealership.

via TV preview: the Piano Guys enter the big time with PBS broadcast | Deseret News.

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We will return to Ryan. But first we have to get through Romney. This was the best thing about the Clint Eastwood warm-up: he ignored the red light and mumbled on for an extra seven minutes, sowing panic, as well as excruciation, in the control tower. All we lacked was a live feed to Romney—to Romney’s characteristic smile of pain (that of a man with a very sore shoulder who has just eased his way into a tight tuxedo). Perhaps this partly explains why the nominee remained so opaque and unrelaxed. He never came close to settling the question that all Marica must ask: is Mitt the kind of guy you’d like to have a glass of water with? At this late stage it’s time to remind ourselves of a salient fact. There is only one principle on which Romney has never wavered, and that is his religion.

He is a crystallized and not an accidental believer. You can see it in his lineless face. Awareness of mortality is in itself ageing (it creases the orbits of the eyes, it torments the brow); and Romney has the look of someone who seriously thinks that he will live forever. He is a Mormon—though he doesn’t like talking about it. And if I were a Mormon, I wouldn’t like talking about it either. Whatever you may feel about their doctrines, the great monotheisms are sanctioned by the continuities of time: Islam has 15 centuries behind it, Christianity has 20, Judaism at least 40. One of the dozens of quackeries that sprang up during the Great Revival, Mormonism was founded on April 6, 1830. The vulgarity and venality—the tar and feathers—of its origins are typical of the era. But there are aspects of its history that might still give us pause.

The first Prophet of Mormonism, Joseph Smith, had 87 wives, of whom the youngest was 14. Brigham Young, the second Prophet, was husband to 70; he also incited a series of murders (to quell intra-church rivalries). Mormons suffered persecution, and they retaliated—in 1857, for example, they killed 120 men, women, and children (the Mountain Meadows massacre). During the Civil War, the Mormons’ sympathies lay with the South, and unavoidably so, for they too dealt in human chattels; as one historian, Hugh Brogan, puts it, “Lincoln might as well have said of polygamy what he said of slavery, that if it was not wrong, nothing was wrong.” Not until 1890 did the church renounce the practice (though it persisted well into living memory); not until 1978 did a further “revelation” disclose that black people were the equals of whites—by which time Mitt Romney was 31 years old.

It may be that the heaviest item in the Mormon baggage is not its moral murk or even its intellectual nullity so much as its hopeless parochialism. “A man with a big heart from a small town,” they called him in Tampa. We don’t question the big heart; but we gravely doubt the big mind. The truth is that Romney, who aspires to lead the free world, looks ridiculous when he’s not in America. How can he bestride the oceans—the Latter-Day Saint with the time-proof face, who believes that the Garden of Eden was located in Missouri?

At the RNC it was Ryan’s oratory, not Romney’s, that inspired the rawest gust of triumphalism. And that rapture, we were told, would remain undiluted by the discovery, the next morning, that the speech was very largely a pack of lies. According to the campaign managers, there is “no penalty,” these days, for political deceit. When planning this race the Republicans envisaged a classic “pincer” strategy: they would buy the election with super-PAC millions, while also stealing it with gerrymandering and voter suppression (an effort that seems to be faltering in the courts). No penalty? Don’t believe it. Who will submit to being lied to with a sneer? The effects of dishonesty are cumulative. Undetectable by focus groups or robocalls, they build in the unconscious mind, creating just the kind of unease that will sway the undecided in November.

via Martin Amis on God, Money, and What's Wrong with the GOP – Newsweek and The Daily Beast.

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Producer Gerald Molen is used to reading reviews – both good and bad – for his movies.

The Oscar winner's resume is golden enough to give him a pretty thick skin. He's helped bring such modern classics as "Minority Report," "Schindler's List" and "Rain Man" to the big screen.

Let's assume he can take whatever a critic can dish out.

Molen wasn't prepared, apparently, to read reviews of his latest film, "2016: Obama's America" calling his creative team racists … and worse.

"It deeply offends me to read reviews labeling me and my fellow filmmakers as racists or bigots or comparing us to Nazis. Their obvious hatred and bias seemingly overwhelms their ability to write a negative review without resorting to the lowest of degrading observations. It raises the question "why are some on the left of the political spectrum so indoctrinated by their masters that they lose all sense of decency and/or intelligent reasoning?" This is such a loss for journalism. An example of this is the recent article in Entertainment Weekly that informed its readers that our film "2016: Obama's America is "fundamentally racist." Really? And this editorial judgment is made by whom? It really speaks highly as to the quality of people making decisions that affect all of us, doesn't it?"

via '2016' Producer Fires Back at Film Critics: Their 'Hatred and Bias' Overwhelm Them.

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Glenn Beck is bringing his brand of conservative commentary back to the television set.

One year after embracing an Internet-only distribution model, Mr. Beck is repositioning his streaming network, TheBlaze TV, as an offering for cable and satellite operators — in other words, TV the old-fashioned way.

via Glenn Beck’s Show Heads to Dish Network – NYTimes.com.

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“It’s not weird to be a Mormon. And it‘s not weird to be president if you’re Mormon,” Beck concluded.

This special episode comes as the nation prepares to potentially elect its first Mormon president. While some biases certainly continue to color Romney’s candidacy, the impact appears to be minimal. As we’ve previously reported, November 2011 Pew Research Center results found that, while Romney may have experienced some negative results due to his Mormon faith in the primary race, his general election chances likely won’t be impacted.

Unfortunately, this hasn’t stopped anti-Mormon attacks from unfolding in media. Beck’s goal, of course, was to dispel some of the myths that drive and fuel these incidents.

via Glenn Beck Dispels Myths Surrounding the Mormon Faith | TheBlaze TV | Video | TheBlaze.com.

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"Current laws on all forms of pornography and obscenity need to be vigorously enforced," the platform said under a plank titled "Making the Internet Family Friendly." Patrick Trueman, president of Morality in Media, welcomed the adoption of that line in the platform, which added on to wording in previous versions that was limited to voicing opposition to child pornography.

After meeting with one of Romney's top policy aides earlier this year, Trueman believes that a Romney Justice Department would be more aggressive in prosecuting against the distribution of pornographic films to the public — and that should include actions against cable and satellite providers like Comcast and Verizon.

"They violate the law more times per day than most of your biggest porn companies in California because they have those [pay-per-view porn] channels, and every time they rent them, that's a federal violation," Trueman said.

via Group believes Romney administration should prosecute pay-per-view porn – The Hill's Hillicon Valley.

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In the movie "The Untouchables," Sean Connery's character asks Kevin Costner's character, Elliot Ness how he is going to take down Al Capone.

"What are you prepared to do?"

Ness replies he is willing to do whatever it takes to stop the evil with which he is faced.

God asks daily "What are you prepared to do?" in our service to Him.

There is an incredible story about an abortion survivor, Gianna Jessen, now told in movie form.  She is a great example of doing all that she can in service to the Lord Jesus Christ.  Another example is that of Representative Ted Harvey of Colorado, and his willingness to do the same in his way. He tells the story of meeting Gianna. Read his account here.

"All I can say is, "Glory to God!" He orchestrated it all, every minute of it, and I was so honored to have been chosen to play a part. May we all continue to be filled with and to fight for the passion of our Lord Jesus Christ!"

 

So, He asks of each of us- "What are YOU prepared to do?"

Learn more at the October Baby website.

 

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For the uninitiated, Hoover and Gandhi is Glenn-shorthand. Jay Edgar Hoover symbolized “top down” abusive power. Gandhi embodied peaceful, spiritual, resistance. He uses Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King, and Booker T. Washington for the latter half of the metaphor as well. The latter half, the peaceful half, has the music. They always have.

via Mark Mabry Explains How the Arts and Music Shape Glenn Beck | TheBlaze.com.

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“I’m not feeling very well,” Hutchins told him. “But I’m cheered up hearing your voice.”

“I’m going to cheer you up even more,” Tagg Romney said, “because my dad would like you to give the opening prayer on the closing night of the convention down in Tampa.”

via Mormon Kenneth Hutchins, Catholic Timothy Dolan to offer prayers at Republican convention | TheBlaze.com.

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